Quotidian (8)

11 July 2018 | The Memorial of St. Barnabas the Apostle

Saint Barnabas was born in Cyprus. He was one of the early converts in Jerusalem and vouched for St Paul when he appeared before the elders there. He accompanied Paul on his first missionary journey and later went to Cyprus with his cousin John Mark (Mark the evangelist) to preach the gospel there. He was probably martyred at Salamis in Cyprus, sometime before the year 61.

The second antiphon from Lauds: Majórem caritátem nemo habet, ut animam suam ponat quis pro amícis suis. Or Greater love than this no man hath, that a man lay down his life for his friends.

Tomorrow, in my Benedictine Breviary (1922), continues the Octave of the Most Sacred Heart, though the feast’s Octave was suppressed in 1955.

This morning I took my older daughters to an STMA colleague’s house in Wake Forest for the first day of Spanish Camp, where the girls will spend half the day learning and having fun. MM attended last year and Va is very excited to attend with her big sister this year.

One of the advantages of Spanish Camp week is attending daily Mass (8:30 am) at beautiful St. Catherine of Siena parish (see below). The Mass was said by Rev. Chesco Garcia, the former parochial vicar for Hispanic ministry at Sacred Heart Cathedral. His microphone cut out sometime before the sacring, which was fine with me; in this, it took on a low-mass feel, and I’ve always been a proponent of microphone-less masses.

See Kevin White’s short article, “Drop the Mic” from First Things in 2012.

The Editorial Board, “The Catholic School Difference” (The Wall Street Journal, 1 June 2018) [link]

The authors found statistically meaningful evidence that students in Catholic schools exhibited less disruptive behavior than their counterparts in other schools. “According to their teachers, Catholic school children argued, fought, got angry, acted impulsively, and disturbed ongoing activities less frequently,” the authors write. Specifically, students in Catholic schools “were more likely to control their temper, respect others’ property, accept their fellow students’ ideas, and handle peer pressure.” In other words, they exhibited more self-discipline.

K. E. Colombini, “Atheists and Their Beliefs” (First Things, 7 June 2018) [link]

But a second interesting correspondence goes unremarked. The popular revival of astrology and other pseudo-sciences comes at a time when schools are throwing resources into variants of STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) curricula, which have largely supplanted the humanities disciplines (art, literature, and history). We are neglecting the humanities, which offer a true understanding of the human heart, in order to develop better touchscreens and smartphone apps, so that our youth can get better horoscopes and learn new yoga poses. This state of affairs confirms Chesterton’s original quote, and shows how much work needs to be done. There is a real cure for the anxiety afflicting today’s youth, but it’s hard work and the answer is not really found in the digital cloud, but well beyond.

St. Catherine, OP
St. Catherine of Siena in Wake Forest, NC
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Quotidian (5)

4 June 2018 | Memorial of Saint Boniface, Bishop and Martyr

For the first forty years of his life Boniface was known as Wynfrith. He was born in Devon and educated at the monastery at Exeter, and then joined the Benedictine abbey at Nursling, near Southampton. He was a teacher and preacher, but he desired to preach the gospel in a foreign land.

In 718, Pope Gregory II commissioned him to do so, at the same time changing his name from Wynfrith to Boniface.Boniface left England, never to return, and took the gospel to the heathen tribes of Germany, where he had great success. He himself was created Bishop of Mainz, and he founded or restored dioceses in Bavaria, Thuringia, and Franconia. In his later years he worked with King Pepin the Short to reform the Frankish church, and then, over seventy years old, set out to evangelize Friesland (part of modern Holland) where he was set upon and murdered, on 5 June 754.

He is buried at Fulda, near Frankfurt, in the monastery he founded himself, and is honoured as the apostle of Germany.

See a short piece on St. Boniface and Germany from New Liturgical Movement

Podcast: John Haldane, “Darkness in the City of Angels: Evil as a Theme, Vice as a Fact” (The Thomistic Institute, 24 Jan 2018) [link via SoundCloud]

Reading: Fr. Jacques Philippe, Searching for and Maintaining Peace: A Small Treatise on Peace of Heart.

Reading: Neal Mukherjee, “A Veritable No Man’s Land, Off the Coast of Scotland” (The New York Times, 7 May 2018) [link]